[Book Review] Building Microservices

Building Microservices – by Sam Newman

5_star

TLDR: If you are looking for an introduction to and overview of the current ‘microservice’ landscape and the concepts and thinking behind it, then look no further. I would recommend this book for architect, developer, QA and operations (DevOps)

Microservices are obviously a very hot topic at the moment, and everyone and their dog appears to have an opinion about this concept. Accordingly, writing a book about microservices and keeping everyone happy is going to be a challenge (and probably impossible).

In my opinion Sam has done a great job here and manages to provide key information on a range of relevant microservice issues, such as the motivations for microservices, how to model services, integration with other systems, deployment, testing, monitoring, security and architecting/implementing microservices at scale.

I’ve seen negative comments towards this book on other sites stating that more code examples should be provided, and although I appreciate their motivations, I don’t believe this will be the book to address these issues. In my experience, code contained within a book can quickly become stale, and the diversity of language (and the associated rate of change) that is currently being used to create microservice implementations would make pleasing everyone an impossible challenge. Instead I recommend people interested in code samples have a Google, or visit InfoQ, DZone or Voxxed where there is plenty of microservice implementation code.

In my opinion I will use this book much like I did the original ‘Continuous Delivery’ book by Jez Humble and Dave Farley – the book will provide an excellent high-level overview of the issues (and potential solutions), help me to understand core concepts and how key components and methodologies relate to each other, and also provide inspiration and pointers to further reading.

Much like I didn’t expect to create a full build pipeline implementation simply from reading the ‘Continuous Delivery’ book, I wouldn’t expect to build a complete microservice ecosystem from Sam’s book. However, after reading both books I began the respective tasks with a lot more insight then I originally had, and I made much smarter decisions (and knew what to look for when searching for more knowledge) once I understood the big picture.

As stated above, I would recommend this book for any software delivery role. I’ve personally seen the benefits of a microservice architecture when deployed for the correct use case, but the nature of this architecture creates new challenges whether you are a developer, QA or operations specialist.

(In the interest of full disclosure I did provide feedback on this book as it was being published via the O’Reilly Early Access program. However, I have endevoured to write a review that takes into account only the final published book.)

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