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As my other blog post (will soon) reveal, my entire experience of Devoxx UK 2014 was awesome, but in particular I enjoyed presenting “Moving to a DevOps Mode: Easy, Hard or just Plain Terrifying” with Steve Poole.

Steve and I have previously presented together about the OpenJDK at JavaOne, but this was a more ambitious project. Earlier in the year we both attended a series of meetups in London, and started talking about our respective experiences with enabling agility within organisation, and working with such topics as Continuous Integration, Continuous Delivery and ‘DevOps’. Steve has plenty of experience of this with large organisations, and I have experience from working with smaller organisations, and so we figure that a joint talk combining all of our learnings would be a good idea.

Both Steve and I were very happy with the talk, and we received some great feedback and questions at the end of the presentation. We will also be presenting a very similar talk at JAX London this year, and so we will try and address all of the comments here.

 

 

You can also watch the full video recorindg of the presentation at Parleys, but in order to view the content you will need to have been an attendee of the conference or pay a subscription:

https://parleys.com/play/53b15b01e4b0543940d9e5ec/chapter1/about

As usual, if you have any comments then please do get in touch!

I once again had the pleasure of talking at Skillsmatter in early May, and this time I presented “Cloud Developer’s DHARMA: Redefining ‘done’ for Cloud applications”. I wrote about this on my company’s blog the night after I delivered the talk, but I’ve just realised I didn’t post anything here – therefore here we are. The synopsis for the talk can be found below.

As is always the case with giving a presentation at Skillsmatter, I very much enjoyed the experience, and there were some great questions and chat in the pub afterwards. Many thanks to all who attended – your comments and feedback are very much appreciated!

Skillsmatter have very kindly recorded the session, and you can watch my full talk here. You can also find a link to the slides on slideshare below.

Cloud Dharma Talk at Skillsmatter - Daniel Bryant

 

Talk synopsis:

Building applications for the IaaS Cloud is easy, right? “Sure, no problem – just lift and shift!” all the Cloud vendors shout in unison. However, the reality of building and deploying Cloud applications can often be different. This talk will introduce lessons learnt from the trenches during two years of designing and implementing cloud-based Java applications, which we have codified into our Cloud developer’s ‘DHARMA’ rules; Documented (just enough); Highly cohesive/loosely coupled (all the way down); Automated from code commit to cloud; Resource aware; Monitored thoroughly; and Antifragile.

We will look at these lessons from both a theoretic and practical perspective using a real-world case study from Instant Access Technologies (IAT) Ltd. IAT recently evolved their epoints.com(http://epoints.com/) customer loyalty platform from a monolithic Java application deployed into a data centre on a ‘big bang’ schedule, to a platform of loosely-coupled JVM-based components, all being continuously deployed into the AWS IaaS Cloud

If you have any questions then please do get in touch via the usual methods!

So, I’m currently travelling back from my first Geecon conference in Krakow, Poland, and I must say it was an awesome experience! Firstly, I have to say a massive congratulations and thanks to all of the organisers and volunteers, and especially to Andrzej (@ags313), Konrad (@ktosopl), Adrian (@adrno) and Adam (@maneo). These guys and girls work tirelessly throughout the year in order to run Geecon, and when I heard that they do everything themselves (without paid-for project managers etc.,) I was even more impressed!

I learned so much at the conference that I’m going to try and do a couple of blog posts to brain-dump my thoughts (although I know from past experience I know that this may not happen, and so I’ll focus on the one post at the moment 🙂 ). I’ll start with a review of the conference itself, move on to key memes (that I saw), and then briefly outline the sessions and social activities that I attended:

Conference Overview

  • The organisation of the conference is superb, right from the location (an out-of-town Cinema), the sessions, the speakers, the attendees, the food, to the amazingly helpful volunteers. My only small minus (and it’s really a symptom of the great success of the conference) was that the corridors can get super crowded during break times and lunch. I was chatting to Andrzej about this, and he mentioned that so many people wanted to come to Geecon that he had to stop accepting registrations after the initial 1200+…wow!
  • Krakow is an awesome city for the conference. It has some amazing sight-seeing and historical opportunities (Old Town, Castle, Salt mines, Auschwitz). Everyone I interacted with in the city was very friendly, and the vast majority also spoke superb English (which again puts the UK’s language skills to shame!)
  • Geecon is not just a Java conference, and this makes it all the better. It may be primarily focused on Java and the JVM, but you can easily pick sessions to avoid this (if you really wanted to?), and I managed to get a nice blend of different languages over the three days
  • Geecon is at the cutting-edge of thought-leadership within software development. There aren’t many conferences that can claim a perfect mix of sessions on programming fundamentals (often ignored), DDD, crafted design and architecture, Agile good practices, Java 8, JEE 7, Spring boot, Groovy, Scala, JavaScript modularity, microservices, DevOps, Open Source Software, low latency performance and more (except perhaps DevoxxUK, but I could be biased 😉 )
  • The social events and after parties are amazing – you’ll probably learn as much at the parties as you will in the main sessions 🙂
  • Get plenty of sleep before the event, and also expect your brain to hurt after the three days of intensive knowledge injection. You know the part of The Matrix films where Neo ‘downloads’ knowledge on Kung-fu while plugged in to chair? Well Geecon is pretty much the beta version of this (fortunately without the wires plugging into your brain)

Key Memes

  • Never stop learning, and make sure you keep revising the fundamentals as well as innovating.
  • Jurgen Appelo’s awesome keynote set the tone for the first part of the above point perfectly, and I would recommend that all developers watch this talk when it is released on video by the Geecon team. The key takeaways for me were; have a goal, work relentlessly towards it (evaluating progress all the way, and adjusting were necessary); daily habits and discipline are key; be open to other people’s ideas; read more; read more; read more… 😉
  • The ever-inspiring Kevlin Henney also did a superb job at both of his talks on Thursday. The first was a call to action for avoiding the common mistakes that many of us make when writing code, and also a reminder that style and layout matter. This can be summed up perfectly by one of his quotes “Style and layout matter in programming for the same reason they matter in writing” Amen to that… The second of Kevlin’s presentations was a homage to the ‘worse is better’ work by Richard Gabriel, and reminded us all of the fundamental’s of agile development, and that often less is more when it comes to software development. Key takeaways here were strive for simplicity, completeness, correctness, consistency
  • Java 8 really is making a difference to developers. I realise that many of the people presenting at the conference are thought-leaders, and also at the cutting-edge of software design, but I could clearly see the impact of Java 8’s new Lambdas and Streams. For a start, it made a lot of the code on slides much more readable (no more crazy anonymous inner Class boilerplate), and also more expressive, which allowed for key memes to be demonstrated in a much more understandable way (for example, in the great talk about Netflix’s RxJava library by Tomasz Kowalczewski)
  • Java EE 7 is also making a clear difference to developers. Many of the JEE sessions I have attended in conferences over the last few years have been about work-arounds for JEE versions <= 6, or the promised benefit of JEE 7, but at Geecon we actually got to see clear improvements from within the developer trenches (for example, Adam Bien’s and Arun Gupta’s sessions)
  • JavaScript really is growing-up. I know that this observation is not particularly new, and the JavaScript language (and tooling) has been developing in leaps and bounds over the past few years, but again at Geecon I saw proper evidence of this. In particular, the session by Paul Bakker and Sander Mak on JavaScript modularity and the proposed enhancements in ECMAScript 6 look awesome.
  • Microservices are at the tipping-point for mainstream adoption (and are in danger of being the ‘next big thing’). Both of Sam Newman’s talks about microservices were superb, and clearly demonstrated that Sam and the guys/girls at Thoughtworks have been doing this stuff in the trenches for quite some time. Sam is clearly ahead of the game in many areas of service design, implementation and delivery that I was very pleased to hear he was writing a book with O’Reily (which I’ve now bought in Early Access format here). Key takeaway’s from Sam’s talks included; software architects should be more like town-planners than building architects, especially when designing with microservices; be flexible with the implementation of microservices, but standardise the stuff ‘in between’ – monitoring, interfaces, deployment, architectural safety; strive for resource (not data or procedure) oriented designs; distributed txns are hard and should be avoided (see CAP theorem 🙂 ); distributed tracing and correlation IDs are very valuable (I’ll second this piece of advice!); get the testing strategy correct (think Mike Cohn’s test pyramid); make thing more ‘production-like’ close to the development (vagrant, docker, packer are useful here); consumer-driven contracts are very useful for testing; semantic monitoring is a great technique for testing in production.
  • The need for well-crafted design and architecture is still as important (maybe more) as it ever was. Sandro Mancuso’s excellent ‘Crafted Design’ talk provided clear evidence for this. Building heavily on DDD-based principles, Sandro proposed a new architecture and package design for Java applications that allows more cohesive modelling of the problem domain, and promotes clear separation between the Model Domain and delivery and infrastructure mechanisms. I wouldn’t do the proposal justice if I tried to describe it here, but check out the slides on Slideshare. It’s seriously worth spending time looking at this, as creating the ideal package/module structure that represents the problem domain is somewhat the holy grail of Java developers. It’s also worth checking out Simon Brown’s related work in this field (of which I am a big fan), and although he wasn’t at Geecon you will be able to catch him at Devoxx UK in June. I chatted to Sandro at the conference, and we both agreed that it would be great if he and Simon could get together sometime for a meeting of minds!
  • Several of the emerging languages and tooling are becoming a lot more opinionated, which I welcome. It’s great to have an uber-flexible language (Scala I’m looking at you here), but the flexibility and lack of constraints can confuse novices, and also stifle the creative challenge. Ken Sipe did an amazing job of introducing Google’s (very opinionated) Go language in an hour session, and this has inspired my to further look into this language as perhaps an alternative to some of the Python I write. Ken also did a superb advanced session on the testing framework Spock. I could see some people’s brains melting at some of the content (and mine got quite hot), but some of the power demonstrated looked simply awesome. Both of Ken’s talks demonstrated to me that the developers of the language/tool had clearly surveyed their respective fields and picked what they considered best for inclusion into their offering. This obviously could be hit-and-miss, but with Go lang and Spock I think we have a couple of winners.

That’s all for the moment, but if you ever get the chance to attend Geecon then make sure you do – you’ll learn lots, and have a great time doing it! if you have any comments then please let me know!

As usual, I had a great time presenting at a London Java Community event, and this time I rolled out my ever-evolving “Chuck Norris Doesn’t Do DevOps” talk.

Sam from RecWorks very kindly agreed to film the talk, and she has uploaded the video to YouTube (thanks Sam, you’re a star!) :


You can also find the slides below, or at my SlideShare account here

The LJC ran it’s ever-popular annual Open Conference on Saturday 23rd November, and this was the first time I’ve made it along. To say I was impressed was an understatement, and I’ll try and capture some more thoughts in a later blog post, but for the moment I wanted to share the slides from the main presentation I delivered “Chuck Norris Doesn’t Need DevOps”

 

Can’t see the presentation slides? Please click here http://www.slideshare.net/dbryant_uk/2013-ljcconf-chuck-norris-doesnt-need-devops

The original pitch for the talk was as follows:

“We all hear the term “DevOps” being thrown around on a daily basis, but what does it actually mean? With a little help from everyone’s favourite 80’s action hero, we’ll undergo a whistle-stop tour of the philosophy, culture and tooling behind this buzzword, specifically aimed at Java Developers.

We’ll also look at a real-world case study from Instant Access Technologies Ltd, and explore the key role that DevOps has played during a successful upgrade of the epoints customer loyalty platform to support increasing traffic. The core discussion will focus on the challenges encountered as we moved from a monolithic app deployed into a data centre on a ‘big bang’ schedule, to a platform of loosely-coupled components, all being continuously deployed into the Cloud.”

Thanks to everyone who attended my presentation! The feedback was most welcome, and the questions were great. If anyone wants to add anything further than please feel free to comment, email or tweet at me!

Instant Chef Starter – by John Ewart

3_star

TL;DR If you are looking for a rapid introduction to Chef, and haven’t got the time (or inclination) to look around the web then this book will meet your needs. However (and it’s a fairly big however), you can get pretty much the same information free from a combination of the excellent Opscode (Chef creators) website and a few Blogs resulting from a web search.

Anyone active within the so-called DevOps space will have heard of tools like Chef, Puppet, CFEngine and Saltstack. These provisioning tools are arguably the backbone on which the modern DevOps movement is based, and in combination with Cloud-based programmable infrastructure (like AWS) they are the driving force in automating configuration and application deployment. Understandably everyone is keen to write books on what is rapidly becoming the next big thing, and in my opinion this does lead to rushed output. This output is often useful to a limited degree, but the same information can often be gleaned (freely) from the interweb, and (perhaps more importantly) tools and techniques on the bleeding edge often evolve so fast that any printed media can become outdated quite quickly. I believe ‘Instant Chef Starter’ book fits into this category.

If you are looking for a book to read on the commute home, which details the key concepts and motivations behind Chef, then you can’t go wrong with getting the Kindle version of this book. However, you will definitely need to supplement your reading by checking the Opscode website for latest developments, and you will also need to start experimenting with the tool to fully understand the benefits it offers. Trust me, when you start spinning up Chef-driven servers and other resource with just a couple of commands via the CLI you are going to be blown away at how easy this stuff is. Your mind will be further blown when you realise that what you’ve just done is massively repeatable and scales very easily (in comparison to older techniques).

In summary, the Kindle version is worth a look if you’re looking for a fast-paced and concise introduction to Chef, and you don’t want to invest time in looking around the Opscode website or other provisioning websites just yet. I can’t recommend the printed book, because at £12 this doesn’t offer good value.

Click Here to buy ‘Instant Chef Starter’ on Amazon (This is a sponsored link. Please click through and help a fellow developer to buy some more books!  )

I’ve been playing around with Chef again this afternoon, and ran into a problem after following the (very useful) Opscode tutorials and then experimenting on my own

The Problem

localhost ==============================================================
localhost
localhost Chef encountered an error attempting to create the client "vagrant.vm"
localhost
localhost ==============================================================
localhost
localhost
localhost
localhost
localhost Authorization Error:
localhost
localhost --------------------
localhost
localhost Your validation client is not authorized to create the client for this node (HTTP 403).
localhost
localhost
localhost
localhost
localhost
localhost
localhost Possible Causes:
localhost
localhost ----------------
localhost
localhost * There may already be a client named "vagrant.vm"
localhost
localhost * Your validation client (xxxxxx-validator) may have misconfigured authorization permissions.
localhost

It’s quite obvious that my earlier tutorial-based activities had registered the ‘vagrant.vm’ node name with my hosted Chef. Accordingly I visited my Hosted Chef portal and removed the node, but after receiving confirmation of the node being deleted I was still getting the same error when attempting to provision my local vm box.

Solution

Give the second Vagrant node a new name when bootstrapping e.g.

$ knife bootstrap localhost \
 --ssh-user vagrant \
 --ssh-password vagrant \
 --ssh-port 2222 \
 --run-list "recipe[apt]" \
 --sudo \
 --node-name "vagrant.vm2"

Alternatively you can delete the first node you created via knife on the CLI (rather than attempting to delete the node via the web-based Hosted Chef interface):

$ knife node delete "vagrant.vm"